International Women’s Day

International Women’s Day is celebrated on March 8 every year. It is a focal point in the movement for women’s rights. However, what is really International Women’s day? What is the history behind it?

The earliest Women’s Day observance was originally called “National Woman’s Day,” and it was held on February 28, 1909 (my birthday) in New York. This day was organized by the Socialist Party of America at the suggestion of Theresa Malkiel.

In August 1910, an International Socialist Women’s Conference was organized to precede the general meeting of the Socialist Second International in Copenhagen, Denmark. This was to proposed the establishment of an annual Women’s day inspired by the U.S. 100 women from 17 different countries agreed with the idea to have a Women’s Day to promote equal rights including suffrage for Women. At that time, Americans still celebrated National Women’s Day on the last Sunday in February.

So why March 8th? In 1914 International Women’s Day was held on March 8 in Germany, possibly because that day was a Sunday, and now it is always held on March 8 in all countries. Another thing to note is that the 1914 observance of the Day in Germany was dedicated to women’s right to vote, which German women did not win until 1918.

Other countries made the day a holiday as well. The State Council in China proclaimed on December 23 that March 8 would be made an official holiday with women in China given a half-day off. The United Nations began celebrating International Women’s Day in the International Women’s Year, 1975. In 1977, the United Nations General Assembly invited member states to proclaim March 8 as the UN Day for women’s rights and world peace.

Back in the states, in 2011 when Obama was still president marked the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day. To commemorate the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day, Barack Obama proclaimed March 2011 to be “Women’s History Month”, calling Americans to mark IWD by reflecting on “the extraordinary accomplishments of women” in shaping the country’s history.

Since then, there has been a theme every year. The theme for International Women’s Day 2019 is: ‘Think equal, build smart, innovate for change’. The focus of the theme is on innovative ways in which to advance gender equality and the empowerment of women, particularly in the areas of social protection systems, access to public services and sustainable infrastructure.

OCD Is Not An Adjective

Little do people know is that I have OCD, which is an compulsive disorder. I have always hated the phrase “I’m so OCD” because most are not OCD. Recently, I did learn that people with OCD do not state they have OCD, including myself.

There are several subtypes of OCD. Some include checking, sensorimotor, relationship, contamination, just right, suicidal, scrupulously, existentialist, harm/responsibly. For me, it is checking. Every time I leave my place I always have a mental checklist I can not leave my place without and say it to myself: key, wallet, ID and phone. This is without fail. When I do leave I still think I forgot something. I even tend to go back and see if I forgot something.

Checking takes various forms such as checking for safety, understanding and mistakes. This could mean checking for locks, appliances, harming others/self, catastrophe, mistakes, body, etc. I check everything 2 times of more. Another example is if I tell someone to lock my door, I still go back hours later to see if the the door is look. I literally unlock the door, open the door, close the door, and lock it. I can’t go to sleep without me and only me locking my door.

These manifestation differ from person to person. For me, it is silent and no one really know except those whom truly have it. OCD is not about being near and cleaning so please do not say “I’m so OCD”.

Anxiety is like a bound rope | Depression is like a black hole

You wake up with the rope around your legs. Getting up feels like getting out of a tight alley space but you do it anyway. All of a sudden, the rope is strangling your legs. You beg. You plead. The rope gets tighter. Restless. It begins to break the skin. Maybe someone hears explaining you can not get unraveled.

“How hard can it be. It’s just a wrong. Your arms are free”

“I already tried”

Then I just don’t answer or ask again.

You wake up again. Now you feel planted but weak. Now you feel you are in a darkened hole tying you to the bed. You see the ceiling but you just lay there. Restless. Aggravated but unable to move.

“Get your lazy behind up”

You just lay there.

You spend all day wresting the rope and that darkened space. You have scars so you cover them up with your favorite jacket.

You wake up again. This time the rope is tighter. Still restless. That dark space is now dark matter suffocating you. You move through the day like The Great Boston Molasses Flood of 1919. You count your breathe to explain but it is no point.

You wake up and the rope makes it towards the torso squeezing the appetite out of you.

“You don’t have an appetite?”

“I’m not really hungry”, just don’t have the energy.

You wake up and somehow you look different. That blackened space turns grey and the rope comes undone. You have a smile today and every is calm. You feel okay today to leave that rope under the bed. Some days it will appear and other days you can jump up with no fear.